CFDs are complex instruments and come with a high risk of losing money rapidly due to leverage. 76% of retail investor accounts lose money when trading CFDs with this provider. You should consider whether you understand how CFDs work and whether you can afford to take the high risk of losing your money.

CFDs are complex instruments and come with a high risk of losing money rapidly due to leverage. 76% of retail investor accounts lose money when trading CFDs with this provider. You should consider whether you understand how CFDs work and whether you can afford to take the high risk of losing your money.

CFDs are complex instruments and come with a high risk of losing money rapidly due to leverage. 76% of retail investor accounts lose money when trading CFDs with this provider. You should consider whether you understand how CFDs work and whether you can afford to take the high risk of losing your money.

xStation 5: Pending orders

BASIC - Lesson 20

When you have your own view on a particular market, but don’t have the time to constantly monitor prices manually, pending orders might be a good solution.

This lesson takes approximately: 15 minutes

*Since the recording of these videos, negative balance protection has come into force from 02.10.17. This means that whilst trading losses cannot exceed funds in your account, your capital is still at risk.

In this lesson you will learn:

  • Types of pending orders that can be found on xStation 5
  • How to place a pending order
  • How to trade right from the chart

When trading the financial markets, there are essentially two ways to open a trade.

Instant execution: your trade is opened immediately at the price available

Pending order: your trade is opened when a market reaches a specific level, chosen by you

Over time, you’ll probably find that you use both types of transactions in your trading. But how exactly do pending orders work, and why are they needed?

The fact is that always being up-to-date with market news and significant moves is important, but good planning is even more important. When you have your own view on a particular market, but don’t have the time to constantly monitor prices manually, pending orders might be a good solution.

 

Unlike instant execution orders where a trade is placed at the current market price, pending orders allow you to set orders that are opened once the price reaches a relevant level, chosen by you. There are four types of pending orders available within xStation 5, but we can group it to just two main types: orders expecting to break a certain market level or orders expecting to bounce back from a certain market level. 

Buy Stop

The Buy Stop order allows you to set a buy order above the current market price. This means that if the current market price is $20 and your Buy Stop is $22, a buy or 'long' position will be opened once the market reaches that price.

Sell Stop

The Sell Stop order allows you to set a sell order below the current market price. So if the current market price is $20 and your Sell Stop price is $18, a sell or ‘short’ position will be opened once the market reaches that price.

Buy Limit

The opposite of a buy stop, the Buy Limit order allows you to set a buy order below the current market price. This means that if the current market price is $20 and your Buy Limit price is $18, then once the market reaches the price level of $18, a buy position will be opened.

Sell Limit

Finally, the Sell Limit order allows you to set a sell order above the current market price. So if the current market price is $20 and the set Sell Limit price is $22, then once the market reaches the price level of $22, a sell position will be opened on this market.

Opening pending orders

You can open an order ticket from the Market Watch Window firstly by choosing the market you would like to trade on and then by pressing the “Order ticket” button or double-clicking on the name of the market. Once you do so, the order ticket will open and you can then select the “Pending order” tab.

Next, select the market level at which the pending order will be activated. You should also choose the size of the position based on the volume, contract value or margin. If necessary, you can set an expiration date. Once all these parameters are set, select the green or red button depending on whether you would like to go long or short.

Trading from the chart

Pending orders may also be placed directly from the chart that you are currently analysing.

You may do so by pressing the button found in the top left corner of the chart, as you can see on the image below.

After doing so, move the mouse cursor on the chart so that you can select a level where the pending order will be opened. Once you have chosen the price level, you can also select Stop Loss or Take Profit orders above or below your level.

After these levels are set an order ticket window will appear with all the parameters that you’ve chosen. Now simply choose the size of the position and place the order by selecting the red or green button depending on the type of order you are placing.
 

As you can see pending orders are very powerful features of xStation 5. They are most useful when you simply can’t constantly watch the market for your entry point, or if the price of an instrument changes quickly and you don’t want to miss the opportunity.

 

Quiz

Test your knowledge of this lesson with our quiz:

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1/3

Which order allows you to buy an instrument after its price rises above a specific level?

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2/3

Which order allows you to sell an instrument when the market rises to a specific level?

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3/3

Pending orders can be placed:

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